Avian And Attributes – Reed

     

“When they had twisted a crown of thorns, they put it on His head, and a reed in His right hand. And they bowed the knee before Him and mocked Him, saying, “Hail, King of the Jews!” Then they spat on Him, and took the reed and struck Him on the head.” (Matthew 27:29-30 NKJV)


Avian and Attributes – Reed

REED, n.
1. The common name of many aquatic plants; most of them large grasses, with hollow jointed stems, such as the common reed of the genus Arundo, the bamboo, &c. The bur-reed is of the genus Sparganium; the Indian Flowering reed of the genus Canna.
2. A musical pipe; reeds being anciently used for instruments of music.
3. A little tube through which a hautboy, bassoon or clarinet is blown.
4. An arrow, as made of a reed headed.
5. Thatch.


Reed Cormorant

TheReed Cormorant (Microcarbo africanus), also known as the long-tailed cormorant, is a bird in the cormorant family Phalacrocoracidae. It breeds in much of Africa south of the Sahara, and Madagascar. It is resident but undertakes some seasonal movements.

The Reed Cormorant can dive to considerable depths, but usually feeds in shallow water. It frequently brings prey to the surface. It takes a wide variety of fish. It prefers small slow-moving fish, and those with long and tapering shapes, such as mormyrids, catfishes, and cichlids. It will less frequently eat soles (which can be important in its diet locally), frogs, aquatic invertebrates, and small birds.

Two to four eggs are laid in a nest in a tree or on the ground, normally hidden from view by long grass.

Reed Parrotbill

The Reed Parrotbill (Paradoxornis heudei) is a species of bird in the Sylviidae family. It is found in Manchuria and eastern China. It is threatened by habitat loss.

The northern subspecies P. h. polivanovi is sometimes regarded as a separate species, the northern parrotbill.

See Parrotbill article Good photos


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Birds whose first or last name starts with “R”

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[Definitions from Webster’s Dictionary of American English (1828), unless noted. Bird info from Wikipedia plus.]